Archives for: March 2010

Tulsa Hall of Fame 1999 Inductees

  • Keith Bailey

    Engineers know how to make things work. In the case of Keith Bailey, this knowledge is not limited to the technicalities of making fluid flow through a pipeline, but extends to a burgeoning corporation and an entire community. Whatever the arena in which he becomes involved, Bailey makes it work. A graduate of the Missouri… [Read On]

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  • Florence L.J. “Bisser” Barnett

    Wendell Wilkie lost his bid to unseat FDR in the 1940 Presidential election. That loss may have been among the last defeats experienced by one of his campaign workers, Florence L.J. Barnett. A graduate of the University of Wisconsin, Mrs. Barnett moved to New York City after leaving school. There she worked a copy writer.… [Read On]

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  • John Kirkpatrick

    He is among Oklahoma’s most distinguished citizens. With a resume that includes more honors and awards than could be listed here, John Kirkpatrick’s career has impacted both ends of the Turner Turnpike. A graduate of the U..S. Naval Academy his career began with sea duty. In 1936, he resigned from the Navy to attend the… [Read On]

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  • Robert Lorton

    Inheriting a legacy can be a tremendous responsibility. In Tulsa, few legacies carry the weight of possessing the last name “Lorton.” The history of influence and accomplishment compiled by Tulsa World publisher Eugene Lorton and his wife, Maude Lorton Myers, is truly formidable. However, in the case of Robert Lorton, not only has he met… [Read On]

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  • Ruth K. Nelson

    Ruth Nelson cares about people. In an environment where it has become fashionable to boast of one’s compassion, Mrs. Nelson makes no boasts. Instead, her life of dedicated service to those less fortunate than herself embodies compassion on a daily basis. Mrs. Nelson arrived in Tulsa with her family as a young child, after the… [Read On]

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  • Josie Vann

    Retirement for most people is a period when they can contemplate lazy days with their feet up, interrupted only by the occasional puttering in the garden. This is not the case with Josie Vann. After a 36 year career as an elementary school teacher she plunged into a career of volunteerism and community service that… [Read On]

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