Category: research

Aug 9th
2016
Posted in Exhibit, History, memories, research

Our next exhibit is coming soon and we need YOUR help!

On the Move: A History of Transportation in Tulsa will examine the many ways Tulsans have moved around through the decades since Tulsa first became a dot on the map and how different types of transportation and patterns of movement helped shape and redefine the city. The first people in the area arrived here on foot, by horseback, or wagon. In the late nineteenth century, Tulsa became a stop on the railroad and the small settlement turned into a city. Before long there were bustling streets filled with cars and trolleys in addition to buggies and Tulsa was well on its way to becoming the Oil Capital of the World.

Exhibit Wishlist – Most Wanted Items

  • Model Train Layout
  • Railroad Pump Car/Hand Car
  • Railroad Track Section (with railroad ties)
  • Tulsa Trolley or Streetcar Items
  • Railroad China
  • Airplane Seat
  • Motorcycle
  • Saddle
  • Carriage or Wagon

Help us tell Tulsa’s stories about transportation

Do you have objects, photographs, or memories related to Tulsa’s transportation history that you would be willing to share? If you have items or information to share, or want to learn more about loaning objects to the museum, please contact Maggie Brown, Director of Exhibits at mbrown@tulsahistory.org.

Share your memories with our Transportation Memories Survey

We need your help to tell us what you remember about transportation in Tulsa. That means trains, planes, automobiles, and boats, wagons, and bicycles too. What do you remember about learning to ride a bike or drive a car? What is the strangest type of transportation you’ve ever used? Do you remember when there were still trolleys or streetcars in Tulsa? (Or have you heard stories about them?)

Fill out our online survey to help us collect information for our exhibit. Your memories will help us tell Tulsa’s stories and preserve local history.

 

 
Create your own user feedback survey

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Jan 14th
2015
Posted in Exhibit, research

Exhibit Wishlist – Most Wanted Items

  • Early (small) 1950s Car
  • Motorcycle
  • Iron Lung
  • Items related to polio outbreak
  • Items related to Tulsa Coliseum
  • Neon Sign
  • Snapshot photos of people doing everyday things
  • 1950s 3-D Glasses
  • 1950s roller skates
  • Items related to Elvis’ concert at the Fairgrounds c. 1956

Help us tell Tulsa’s tales from the 50s

Do you have objects, photographs, or memories from the 1950s that you would be willing to share? If you have items or information to share, or want to learn more about loaning objects to the museum, please contact Maggie Brown, Director of Exhibits, mbrown@tulsahistory.org or 918.712.9484.

Share your memories with our 1950s Memories Survey

If you have personal stories about the “nifty fifties” in Tulsa or have heard tales from family or friends about their experiences we need your help. Your information and memories will help add to our exhibit research and may even be featured in the gallery.

Create your free online surveys with SurveyMonkey , the world’s leading questionnaire tool.

 

 

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Jan 13th
2015
Posted in Events, History, Kiosk, research

Allotment map

 This event was held on Friday, January 23rd.

Maps are available for order at the museum: $75, full size: 3×5 feet.

Visit the Tulsa World Website to see the full map HERE.

A large, framed map reflecting the early land ownership of the city of Tulsa will be presented by Muscogee Creek Chief George Tiger to Tulsa Mayor Dewey Bartlett on Jan. 23 at the Tulsa Historical Society & Museum.

“Creek citizens were each allotted 160 acres of land,” said Principal Chief George Tiger. “These allotments covered the entire area stretching from Admiral Boulevard to 121st Street South and from Mingo Road to 65th W. Avenue. The map shows the names of many prominent Tulsa families such as the Perrymans, Graysons, Bruners, Blands and Partridge to name just a few.”

Bartlett said Tulsa stands alone among U.S. cities with this unique Indian land allotment history.

“All Tulsans should be proud of this rich history shared by Indian and non-Indian alike. As mayor, I am pleased to receive this map with the hope that it will continue to build awareness of Tulsa’s unique history.”

Perryman descendants J.D. Colbert and Shelby Navarro spearheaded the map project.

The map uses data from Hastain’s Township Plats of the Creek Nation published by E. Hastain in 1910 with an overlay of the current major street grid and highways in Tulsa. Also represented are prominent city landmarks along with how the name Tulsa evolved from the Creek language ‘Tvlvhasse,’ meaning “Old Town.”

 

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Jan 29th
2014
Posted in Exhibit, memories, research, Uncategorized

YOU can help!

The museum is always looking for artifacts, photographs, and stories to share with the public in upcoming exhibits. Right now we need YOUR help with our upcoming 1930s exhibit.

YOUR memories of the Tulsa area in the 1930s

If you have personal stories about the Depression or have heard tales from family or friends about their experiences we want to hear them.  Please contact the museum or take our handy online survey:

Click here to take online survey

Artifact Wishlist – we are looking for artifacts, photographs, and information related to:

  • Depression Scrip (substitute currency used by companies or communities in place of government issued money)
  • Mid-Continent Oil Refinery Strike Photos (1938-1940)
  • Ice Skates
  • Bicycle and/or Tricycle
  • Children’s Clothing
  • Furniture
  • New Deal related items: photos, publications, or artifacts related to WPA, CCC, etc. projects or camps in Tulsa area.
  • Information, photos or items related to Quaker Drug formerly at 18th & Baltimore

If you have items or information to share, or want to learn more about loaning objects to the museum, please contact Maggie Brown, Director of Exhibits, mbrown@tulsahistory.org or 918.712.9484.

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