Transportation Exhibit Wishlist: We Need YOUR help

Aug 9th
2016
Posted in Exhibit, History, memories, research

Our next exhibit is coming soon and we need YOUR help!

On the Move: A History of Transportation in Tulsa will examine the many ways Tulsans have moved around through the decades since Tulsa first became a dot on the map and how different types of transportation and patterns of movement helped shape and redefine the city. The first people in the area arrived here on foot, by horseback, or wagon. In the late nineteenth century, Tulsa became a stop on the railroad and the small settlement turned into a city. Before long there were bustling streets filled with cars and trolleys in addition to buggies and Tulsa was well on its way to becoming the Oil Capital of the World.

Exhibit Wishlist – Most Wanted Items

  • Model Train Layout
  • Railroad Pump Car/Hand Car
  • Railroad Track Section (with railroad ties)
  • Tulsa Trolley or Streetcar Items
  • Railroad China
  • Airplane Seat
  • Motorcycle
  • Saddle
  • Carriage or Wagon

Help us tell Tulsa’s stories about transportation

Do you have objects, photographs, or memories related to Tulsa’s transportation history that you would be willing to share? If you have items or information to share, or want to learn more about loaning objects to the museum, please contact Maggie Brown, Director of Exhibits at mbrown@tulsahistory.org.

Share your memories with our Transportation Memories Survey

We need your help to tell us what you remember about transportation in Tulsa. That means trains, planes, automobiles, and boats, wagons, and bicycles too. What do you remember about learning to ride a bike or drive a car? What is the strangest type of transportation you’ve ever used? Do you remember when there were still trolleys or streetcars in Tulsa? (Or have you heard stories about them?)

Fill out our online survey to help us collect information for our exhibit. Your memories will help us tell Tulsa’s stories and preserve local history.

 

 
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